Workin’ It

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I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, hospital and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing stories from a two-week vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it with nature?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, approved or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, more about I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things greater importance. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, erectile and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, approved or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, search I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things prior. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, medical and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, pills or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, information pills I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, viagra sale and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, pills or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

This post is from my dearest friend, health my business partner, sick the woman I go to when I need open-hearted advisement. Thanks for sharing, sick JR.

None of us is as smart as all of us.

Written on a whiteboard in the window of a small town shop, that message made me smile. Simply put, collaboration is divine. Never should it be under valued.

The notion of collective efficiency hit home hard and fast when I took my first maternity leave several years ago. It was quite a plan and a list I had made in the weeks leading up, carefully thought out, ready to be proficiently executed. As it turns out, babies laugh in the face of plans, lists and false senses of control. Comprehension of working relationships became a make-it or break-it for me when trying to get my feet back into the working game. It took a new understanding of time, and a more honest approach to my
working relationships.

Seeing the real value in time changed a lot for me when I first returned. Time is one of the most priceless commodities every person possesses. Giving of our energy and talents always comes at the cost of giving our time. When it’s spent wisely it is a payoff worth its weight. Understanding that no one can do it all alone, or perhaps more aptly put, no one has the time to do it all alone, made giving up control an easier pill to swallow.

Approaching working relationships with honesty was also integral for me to learn. I think the key is to focus on the second half of that term, the relationship side. It doesn’t matter if I’m paying you or you’re paying me, we still exist in a relationship, and that needs to honoured. Respecting the other side’s role and trusting in the combined force of the relationship is what makes the effort worth the while. It also usually makes the effort a much more brilliant one.

Four years later and I’m on my third round of maternity leave this fall. No lists in sight this time. This time around, I’m just going fall back on the “all of us” group that’s in my corner. Just to be certain, I’ll promise them some Christmas baking when I return in December. Baking bribes, like collaboration, are also not to be under valued.
This post is from my dearest friend, viagra 60mg my business partner, website the woman I go to when I need open-hearted advisement. Thanks for sharing, prescription JR.

None of us is as smart as all of us.

Written on a whiteboard in the window of a small town shop, that message made me smile. Simply put, collaboration is divine. Never should it be under valued.

The notion of collective efficiency hit home hard and fast when I took my first maternity leave several years ago. It was quite a plan and a list I had made in the weeks leading up, carefully thought out, ready to be proficiently executed. As it turns out, babies laugh in the face of plans, lists and false senses of control. Comprehension of working relationships became a make-it or break-it for me when trying to get my feet back into the working game. It took a new understanding of time, and a more honest approach to my
working relationships.

Seeing the real value in time changed a lot for me when I first returned. Time is one of the most priceless commodities every person possesses. Giving of our energy and talents always comes at the cost of giving our time. When it’s spent wisely it is a payoff worth its weight. Understanding that no one can do it all alone, or perhaps more aptly put, no one has the time to do it all alone, made giving up control an easier pill to swallow.

Approaching working relationships with honesty was also integral for me to learn. I think the key is to focus on the second half of that term, the relationship side. It doesn’t matter if I’m paying you or you’re paying me, we still exist in a relationship, and that needs to honoured. Respecting the other side’s role and trusting in the combined force of the relationship is what makes the effort worth the while. It also usually makes the effort a much more brilliant one.

Four years later and I’m on my third round of maternity leave this fall. No lists in sight this time. This time around, I’m just going fall back on the “all of us” group that’s in my corner. Just to be certain, I’ll promise them some Christmas baking when I return in December. Baking bribes, like collaboration, are also not to be under valued.
I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, viagra and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, viagra sale or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, order I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, healing and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, unhealthy or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, viagra 60mg I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, this web and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I saw this graphic on Pinterest last week and it hit me like a truck.

When did being “too busy” become a lifestyle to aspire to? It often feels like a competition when you catch up with someone you haven’t seen in awhile to prove that you have the most going on in your life and the least free time.

Why?

Why can’t we be just as happy to relate enjoying every moment as we are to lament about how we’ve chosen to fill the minutes?

What happened to being present in the real part of our lives – the relationships? To making time with our family and friends a priority, this web and actually enjoying it rather than worrying about where else we could be at or what else we could be doing? To feeling joy rather than guilt at sharing memories from a long vacation? To taking full advantage of a beautiful day by spending it connecting with nature and people we love?

I often wonder if it is that competitive nature, or if we just like to have a reason to complain.

Because what we are really complaining about is the choices we’ve made. Yes, I said it. When we go on about how busy and unhappy we are, we are really saying, “I chose the wrong priorities.”

And I’m as guilty of it as anyone – I can easily get caught up in the “one-up” game. So I’ve been making a conscious effort to really evaluate where I allocate my time, and give the important things priority. The other promise I’ve made myself is to never again give the answer of being “so busy” to anyone who asks how I am or how things are going. Really, they are dealing with the same struggles.

I think we were given this life to enjoy all it has to offer, to take the opportunities for joy that we are presented, and to leave this world better than we found it. That’s hard to do when we’re “too busy.”

I have a (not so) secret love for long, unhealthy plaid skirts. In fact, cost there are two in my closet and if I could justify it there would be a lot more. They are warm. They are versatile. And they are always in style (I say).

[a fun skirt from Denim & Supply Co.]

plaid skirt

 

[classic little gem from the UK]

plaid skirt

Working from a home office is awesome. It used to drive me insane, this the amount of time I felt I wasted commuting to work, order and, let’s be honest, getting primped for an office gig. It used to be an hour getting ready, 30 minutes driving to work, and then 30-60 minutes back home. I love being able to roll out of bed in the morning and walk downstairs to my computer. Ten minutes to brush my teeth, put on sweats clothes, make coffee and a piece of toast, and I’m at work. But, I’ll admit there are days I wish I had an excuse to wear some cool “work” clothes. It somehow doesn’t seem worth it when no one else will see them…

Here’s what I’d wear if I had a reason to:

 

workin' it
workin' it

workin' it

2 Responses to “Workin’ It”

  1. Tiffany

    I would like to invite you to New Mexico. To take me shopping and live in my closet for a week or two.

    ~Tiffany